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    A Nightmare on Elm Street
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (08 February, 2005)
    list price: $12.97 -- our price: $11.67
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Editorial Review

    Wes Craven's 1984 horror film is a better movie than it is generally credited for being. Forget the tawdry sequels; this highly original, almost surrealist work stars Robert Englund as a mutilated monster who kills teenagers during their dreams. Craven, who only directed one Elm Street sequel (Wes Craven's New Nightmare), takes the Hitchcockian step of layering in psychological explanations for the terror and then proving them all irrelevant in the face of mindless evil. The horror in the film is emotionally raw, in contrast to the overimaginative set pieces of most of the sequels that followed; and the final scene is as deeply unsettling as anything Luis Buñuel ever committed to film. --Tom Keogh ... Read more

    Features

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    • Widescreen
    • Closed-captioned
    Reviews (296)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Horror's Master
    I usually begin reviews with a plot synopsis, but for A Nightmare on Elm Street, there is really no use. Everyone knows the story of Freddy Krueger. Just like Heather Langenkamp mentioned in Wes Craven's New Nightmare, "Every kid knows who Freddy is. He's like Santa Claus or King Kong ...".

    There really isn't much one could say about A Nightmare on Elm Street that hasn't been said before. It's a true horror classic. Wes Craven created a world wherein the only place one thinks is the safest is the place where there is no safety. Robert Englund gave gruesome life to the character of Freddy Krueger, and it is here that he is his scariest and most brutal (aside from New Nightmare). Heather Langenkamp embodied a true frightened teenager who realizes that only she can destroy Freddy after he has stripped every single bit of life she once had. The transition from normal teenager to - like I said - a girl who's life has been stripped from her by a man who everyone thinks to be dead is seamless. The atmosphere that Craven gave to the film is chilling with every mood portrayed amazingly through each scene.

    The DVD we get is not top-notch, but it is worthy of owning. The commentary was taken from the laserdisc commentary, but it's still worth listening to. To hear Craven, Langenkamp, John Saxon, and Haitkin talk about their experiences with the movie, the origins of it, and more is a great listen for fans. The theatrical trailer is also here. I am really hoping for a newer edition in the future (you know how crazy dvd is) because there is tons of material that is not available on the DVD that I know is out there. Many deleted scenes, a few more trailers / teasers, and a new documentary on the entire series would be amazing.

    A Nightmare on Elm Street is a true horror classic given a good treatment on this DVD release

    5-0 out of 5 stars Scary
    This was a scary horror movie.The scariest part, is the first with Tina.This is the kinda movie that guys, who want to wrap the arm around girls see.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A Nightmare on Elm Street(1984)
    Director:Wes Craven.
    Cast:John Saxon, Ronee Blakley, Heather Langenkamp, Robert Englund, Johnny Depp.
    Rated R for violence, language, gore, and mild sexual situations.
    Running Time:91 minutes.

    Director Wes Craven's coming out party, "A Nightmare on Elm Street" is one of the most original spine-tinglers of the past quarter-century.What the film lacks in budget and special effects is made up with a superb, mesmerizing script written by Craven, a devilish performance by the underrated Robert Englund as the demonic fiend, and an excellent musical score that only heightens the tension.

    Heather Langenkamp stars as Nancy Thompson, a regular teenage girl who wants nothing but to fit in and life a normal life.Her world is turned upside down as her terrifying dreams of a burnt maniac with knifes for fingers becomes a reality.As Freddy Krueger, the infamous murderer, stalks all of Nancy's friends in their dreams, Nancy attempts to uncover the secrets behind Kreuger, learn why he is after her, and stop him once and for all.John Saxon stars as the police officer daddy who would do anything for his little girl, but we soon find out that he is not all that he is not all that he is cracked up to be.

    Famous for many of its incredibly outlandish murder sequences, including the scene in which a girl is tossed around the ceiling of her room, bleeding profusely from knife wounds, as her boyfriend watches petrified in the corner.Craven does a masterful job of creating suspense that leads to the ultimate showdown between good and evil.He also takes a page from John Carpenter's play book and keeps the twists and turns coming until the last reel.Robert Englund is stupendous as the icon Krueger, allowing enough of his humorous personality to surface throughout the performance, but it does not envelop the film and take away from the genuine terror on the screen."A Nightmare on Elm Street" is a true masterpiece of cinematic horror--originality, great performances from the entire cast, and of course, an introductory role from none other than Johnny Depp.Gory, slasher horror at its creepy finest.
    ... Read more

    Asin: B00000JQTT
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $11.67

    A Nightmare on Elm Street 2 - Freddy's Revenge
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $13.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    • Closed-captioned
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    Reviews (176)

    2-0 out of 5 stars Not Really Revenge
    What Wes Craven did perfect in A Nightmare on Elm Street, it's first sequel Freddy's Revenge did not follow up on. Where Nightmare capitalized on relationships with family and friends, Revenge fell flat on that and the relationships that they tried to muster up felt choppy. Where Nightmare began a set up of Freddy's origin and motives, Revenge basically just rehashed and did nothing more. David Chaskin, writer of Freddy's Revenge, did nothing to creatively further the story of Elm Street along. What he basically did was create a story that has little relation (Elm Street, the house, and Freddy) to the original. There is so much more that he could have done to make the story more interesting.

    There is obviously a huge homosexual overtone included in the film. Instead of throwing bits of it here and there, why not have either delved deeper into the psychology of Jesse's curiosity, or just leave the subplot behind? It did nothing for the film.

    Mark Patton, as Jesse, gave an okay show here. As did his co-star Kim Myers (who's constant comparison of looks to Meryl Streep never end, but are true). But the dialogue they were given and the situations they were put in weren't so good. Robert Englund continues to give bitter life to Freddy Krueger. The man was born to portay Krueger.

    All blunders aside, director Jack Sholder did set up a few interesting pieces. The party gone bad was a nice little piece, and Lisa's descent into Freddy's boiler was neat although the weird baby-faced dogs and stupid super-rat were kind of offbeat. One of the more famous scenes from Revenge where Jesse first crosses paths with Freddy is one of the better parts.

    The DVD pretty much comes barebones with just the Jump to a Nightmare feature. Then again, there's not much more one can hope for for this movie.

    A Nightmare on Elm Street : Freddy's Revenge (which really, who's he getting revenge on? Certainly not Nancy, and certainly not any of the kids of the parents who torched him) is one of the more lackluster of the series. It has little to do with part one and nothing to do with the entries after it, so it's actually skippable. But I do recommend it for the performance from Robert Englund and a few good scenes.

    2-0 out of 5 stars A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge (Two Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Mark Patton, Kim Myers, Robert Rusler, Clu Gulager, Hope Lange, Marshall Bell, Melinda O. Fee, Thom McFadden, Sydney Walsh, Robert Englund, Christie Clark. Score Composed By Christopher Young. Co-Line Produced By Joel Soisson. Produced By Robert Shaye. Directed By Jack Sholder. (R) For Violence, Gore, Profanity, Suggested Drug Use, Brief Nudity and Mild Sexual Content; 85m.; 1985.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: Homosexual Freddy is here, and that's the nicest way the insult for this film can be phrased. Examples...at one point during this picture, Freddy caresses a young man's forehead with a razor-tipped finger and says that he "needs" him (who said Freddy's above being hokey?). The Springwood school gymnasium coach frequents a gay S&M club (replete with studded leather vest). He also is murdered in a bondage/whipping execution that would have Sigmund Freud up in arms with its imagery. The film also features some of the most ridiculous dialogue in any eighties horror film, and that says a lot. As far as the story goes, we find young Jesse Walsh (Mark Patton) and his family moving into the Elm Street home from the first film. Jesse has trouble adjusting because of his overwhelming nightmares. It turns out, a demonic force wants to control his body and use him as a killing machine. The premise for this film is so laughably far away from the original that it's almost painful to watch. There are very few actual dream sequences. Most of the "horrors" take place in the waking world. Jesse screams like a girl at every available opportunity. It's too undignified to be taken seriously. It's more reminiscent of a bad haunting or possession story rather than the psychological slasher flick it was derived from. Obviously the rules of Freddy weren't properly established for this sequel. Freddy seems to want to become human again rather than feed off the souls of his dream world dissections. It's a travesty to see this horror franchise sink so low. Christopher Young's new score is a terrible conglomeration of weak movements and forgettable follies. Young wouldn't hit his composing stride for another two years (when he scored Clive Barker's "Hellraiser"). Even Robert Englund seems out of place as Freddy Krueger. Fortunately for fright fanatics, Wes Craven wasn't happy with this entry in the series either. He would return as co-author and co-executive producer of the third film. The only truly memorable sequence in this film is when the fans have the chance to see Englund out of the Freddy make-up for the first time in the series. He plays the bus driver at the beginning of the movie. Overall, this was a bad attempt to carry on the legacy of a classic chiller. The makers of this film shouldn't even be given credit for trying to make a sequel, because they certainly didn't try very hard.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: There is a 1.85:1 widescreen presentation for this film which is nice to look at, however color tones seem a tad faded from time to time and the definition doesn't always seem fully realized. It's an admirable job but it's just not as clean as it could have been in this digital age. The lackluster 5.1 surround sound which accompanies the film is sometimes fuzzy and less precise than its predecessor. This disc also includes the original mono audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the film. As with other entries in the boxed set, New Line has stored this DVD in a paper case. The cover features a miniaturized version of the theatrical poster while the rest of the case is devoid of any artwork. The inside cover lists the film's special features and gives the twenty-six chapter stops for this eighty-five minute movie. The disc itself is painted and features a photograph of Freddy Krueger taken in Jesse Walsh's home by the cellar door. There are no noteworthy special features for this film. The "Jump to a Nightmare" option is carried over from the first disc. An annoyingly printed cast and crew section is available that was taken from the movie's original press kit. DVD-ROM users have the chance to read the film's screenplay, play the second "Dream World" trivia game and have access to up-to-the-minute cast and crew biographies and weblinks.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to hide hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to make sense of this turgid filmmaking calamity than you are of finding easter eggs on the DVD itself.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: Viewers get to see a very wet Lisa Webber (Kim Myers) exit her pool to answer a telephone. Later in the film, Myers gives us a nice view of her cleavage in the pool cabana. Plus there's plenty of bikini-clad feminine eye candy surrounding the pool at Lisa's party, but none of it adds up to anything worthwhile.

    THE GORE REPORT: There's a school shower that squirts blood and some random gory slayings but it doesn't add up to the levels of carnage that it should. We do get to see Freddy's face melt off at one point but it looks more tacky than terrifying.

    SAY AGAIN: "You are all my children now." - Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund)

    THE FINAL SAY: No, I don't recommend buying this DVD. Inevitably, you're going to get the movie if you buy the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set. A completest might like that idea. However, the movie is just not worth buying separately. It's tarnished vision of Freddy will more likely leave viewers feeling humiliated that they wasted their money buying the film rather than horrified by actually watching it.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Terror in My Heart" Performed By the Reds. "Touch Me (All Night Long)" Performed By Wish Featuring Fonda Rae. "Whisper to a Scream" Performed By Bobby O. and Claudja Barry. "On the Air Tonight" Performed By Willy Finlayson. "Moving in the Night" Performed By Skagerack. "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?" Performed By Bing Crosby. Score Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records.

    4-0 out of 5 stars Okay movie, great DVD transfer
    Although not as good as the original, Freddy's Revenge is still a somewhat good horror film, but it is the worst Nightmare yet.

    New Line has given us a good digital transfer (there are some video artifacts and also a lot of grain and audio compression shakes), complete with 5.1 and monaural soundtracks. The former isn't really that exciting, if compared to the mono track. But it is still good.

    New Line's the house Freddy built, no wonder they love the films so much. 3 stars for the film, 4 stars for the DVD. ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630858
    Sales Rank: 18208
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $13.47

    A Nightmare on Elm Street 3 - Dream Warriors
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $11.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (155)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (Four Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Heather Langenkamp, Patricia Arquette, Larry Fishburne, Priscilla Pointer, Craig Wasson, Brooke Bundy, Bradley Gregg, Rodney Eastman, Ira Heiden, Nan Martin, Jennifer Rubin, Ken Sagoes, Penelope Sudrow, John Saxon, Dick Cavett, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Robert Englund. Krueger Makeup and Effects By Kevin Yagher. Story Co-Written, Screenplay Co-Written and Co-Executive Produced By Wes Craven. Score Composed By Angelo Badalamenti. Line Produced By Rachel Talalay. Screenplay Co-Written By Frank Darabont. Produced By Robert Shaye. Screenplay Co-Written and Directed By Chuck Russell. (R) For Violence, Mild Gore, Profanity, Drug Content, Brief Nudity and Very Mild Sexual Content; 96m.; 1987.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: "Nightmare" creator Wes Craven returned for this third Freddy feature and brought with him an intelligent, enjoyable story. Springwood teenagers are now being institutionalized because of their bad dreams, yet the scientists meant to protect them are only doing them more harm by not realizing the cause of their problem. But when new assistant Nancy Thompson (Heather Langenkamp, another returnee from the original film) enters their lives, she begins to help them make sense of their monster. In turn, each of the teenagers uncovers their own unique "dream power" to aid in combating Freddy. Taryn (Jennifer Rubin) is a recovering junkie who becomes a beautiful and bad switchblade punk. Will (Ira Heiden) is a soft-spoken paraplegic who becomes the Wizard Master. Kincaid (Ken Sagoes) is a loud-mouthed, hot-tempered teen who becomes a super strong bastion for the group. Joey (Rodney Eastman) is a sweet mute who uncovers a hidden vocal talent. Kristen Parker (Patricia Arquette) is the innocent newcomer to the group who displays extraordinary acrobatic skills and also possesses the ability to bring other people into her dreams. Together, alongside scientist Neil Gordon (Craig Wasson) they try to end the killing spree of the maniacal Freddy Krueger once and for all. They are also aided in their efforts by the mysterious Sister Mary Helena (Nan Martin) who helps push Neil in the right direction to save his suffering patients and Nancy's father Donald (John Saxon, demoted from police lieutenant to some form of local security guard) who sheds some light on Krueger's mortal past. This was also the film that introduced dream suppressant Hypnocil...remember that name, as seventeen years later it would be used again in the "Freddy vs. Jason" spin-off. This was also the first film to establish the fact that the souls of Freddy's victims gave him more power in his quest to invade teenagers' nightmares. Director Chuck Russell keeps the suspense at a decorous pace for this film while new score composer Angelo Badalamenti brings new depth to the musical background. Unlike Christopher Young ("Nightmare 2"), Badalamenti remained faithful to his source material and even included touches of Charles Bernstein's haunting original score in this presentation. Death scenes have become more over the top than they were in previous "Nightmare" entries and the cast itself has become a more cohesive unit. Only Patricia Arquette seems unsure of her acting abilities, coming off as awkward and stiff when she interacts with her fellow cast mates. Robert Englund, on the other hand, has grown in his portrayal of Freddy Krueger. Unlike "Nightmare 2" where he basically sleepwalked through his performance, he sinks his teeth into the role and thoroughly enjoys himself. Trivia buffs take note of two occurrences in this film. First, the priest (Jack Shea) who presides over the funeral in this film is the same one who did the honors for Tina Gray's funeral in the original "Nightmare". Secondly, the streak of white hair on Nancy's head has miraculously moved. When she received the silver streak in the first movie, it was on the left side of her head. In this film, it has magically transported itself over to the right side of her head. Overall, this is a winning horror film that delivers the chills, thrills and spectacle terror fans crave.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: There is a 1.85:1 widescreen presentation of this film which is relatively clean and free of grain. The appearance is properly dark and subdued and there's more precision and lucidity than there was in "Nightmare 2". Even the stop motion skeleton looks less fraudulent than it did on any existing video print of the film. The 5.1 surround sound is also a drastic step up from its predecessor. Back are the freak out, fairly multi-directional effects and intense resonance of the first entry in the series, although back speakers are not utilized to their fullest extent until the finale of the film. This disc also includes the original mono audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the film. This disc arrives in another paper case from New Line and it features a miniaturized version of the original theatrical poster on its cover. The rest of the case is devoid of any artwork, however the inside spotlights the list of special features and the thirty-one chapter stops that make up this hour and a half long movie. The DVD itself has been painted with a photograph of Freddy Krueger extending his razor-gloved hand in the hallway where the "wheelchair from hell" sequence would take place. Special features on this disc include the now obligatory "Jump to a Nightmare" option. The extensive cast and crew information section was taken from the original theatrical press kit for the movie and is a remarkable improvement over the section featured on the "Nightmare 2" DVD. DVD-ROM users also have access to an interactive screenplay for the film, the third "Dream World" trivia game and up-to-the-minute weblinks.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to find a way out of the locked "quiet room" than you are of finding easter eggs on this one.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: Joey (Rodney Eastman) is seduced by sexy nurse Marcie (Stacey Alden) who bares her breasts and wears a pair of slinky white thong panties. That's the only moment of sexuality in the entire production.

    THE GORE REPORT: Early on in the film, Freddy turns luckless Phillip (Bradley Gregg) into a bloody walking puppet using Phillip's own tendons as marionette strings. Later, Kristen Parker's mother Elaine (Brooke Bundy) has her head chopped off by Freddy in one of Kristen's dream sequences.

    SAY AGAIN: "In the name of Lowrek, Prince of Elves, demon begone!" - Will (Ira Heiden). "Sorry, kid. I don't believe in fairy tales." - Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund).

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this DVD. Even without being a part of the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set, this is still an essential entry into horror history. After the failure of the first sequel, this is a refreshing reversion back to the psychological terror and revisionist humor that made the original film so popular.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Dream Warrior" Performed By Dokken. "Into the Fire" Performed By Dokken. Score Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Nightmare Sequel
    This sequel is the best in so many ways, great special effects, very good, creative storyline, and interesting characters. The film is much better than the disappointing first sequel, Freddy's Revenge. Although the dark, terrifying Freddy from the first two gone, he makes up for it with very creative deaths, and one-liners before every kill. Also this film is quite fast paced and has stop motion photography; Freddy does not stop all is this one. This film has many cool, yet horrific scenes in it, including the claymation Freddy scene. The deaths in this film are so cool, and very creative. The scene where this girl is watching television, and gets her head eventually smashed into to the tv by Freddy, is an very terrifying, and well as creative death scene in the movie. Also the scene where Phillips is turn into a puppet using strings made out of his blood and arteries, was the best death scene in the movie.

    This film is different from the first two Elm Street in the fact, that it is not a personal story, but rather about several different teens, with different personalites and characteristics, who are all being tormented in their dream by the infamous Freddy Kreuger, all of the teens are helpless against the demonic dream stalker, until the heroine and main character of the first NOES film Nancy Thompson comes by to visit. Nancy Thompson is now a dream researcher, as come to help the struggling teens, who are threatened by Mr. Kreuger in their dreams. She tells the teens to be Dream Warriors, and fight back against Krueger or ingage in dream combat. Although the teens do fight back, they don't work as team, and are slaughtered one by one by Freddy Krueger, in very evil and imaginative ways. The teens learn they all have different powers in the dream world, and they use it to fight Krueger.Although the film does have incredible special effects, and awesome death sequences, the film was made with still quite a small budget ,only an estimated 4 million dollars. Even Nancy Thompson herself is killed in this film, by Freddy pretending to be her father.

    This film is an 80's classic, and definitely the best sequel of the nightmare films, it has most of the darkness and eerieness of the first film, and comical elements that made the sequels after it after it great, including the one-liners, and the imaginative dream death sequences. This film racked almost or nearly close to 50 million dollars, and is the most successful elm street sequel. Freddy gained permanent cinema icon status after this film, and gained millions of new fans around the world. Buy this film on DVD or VHS if you like, it's definitely the best elm street film, and it has quite a bit more special features than other two Elm Street films. The picture of this film was excellent, and actually really that grainy, and you have a choice between Dolby 3.1 or Surround Sound, and one thing makes this film so much more excellent, is that finally get to learn a lot more about Freddy's origins, like the fact he was the Bastard son of hundred maniacs, and that his mother got accidently raped in an asylum and so much more. Dream Warriors revived the Nightmare after the somewhat pathetic Freddy's Revenge. This film is spectacular on DVD, and is definitely must a see, go buy or rent this film now, or DVD or VHS, it's an 80's classic, and the best Freddy film ever, you will enjoy it.



    4-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic sequel, kicks Freddy's Revenge's butt
    Dream Warriors has all the elements of a horror film and an action/comedy in one handy little package. Not to mention the return of Nancy and her father. The special effects improve over the first two films, with some of the best stop-motion this side of Ray Harryhausen. Death scenes are also an improvement, with probably the most famous Freddy one-liner ever: "Welcome to prime time, b*tch!"

    The digital transfer is quite good, with a solid 5.1 track. But things really start to heat up when we reach the Dream Master.

    A great sequel in a good DVD. 4 stars for the movie and DVD. ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630866
    Sales Rank: 12926
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $11.98

    A Nightmare on Elm Street 4 - The Dream Master
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $11.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (129)

    4-0 out of 5 stars A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (Four Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Robert Englund, Rodney Eastman, Danny Hassel, Andras Jones, Tuesday Knight, Ken Sagoes, Lisa Wilcox, Brooke Bundy, Nicholas Mele, Toy Newkirk, Brooke Theiss, Hope Marie Carlton, Linnea Quigley. Freddy Krueger Makeup By Kevin Yagher. Score Composed By Craig Safan. Co-Produced By Robert Shaye. Co-Produced By Rachel Talalay. Directed By Renny Harlin. (R) For Violence, Mild Gore, Profanity, Brief Nudity and Very Mild Sexual Content; 93m.; 1988.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: The last of the original Elm Street kids thought they buried the nightmare that was Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund). But it's hard to keep pure evil down, and Freddy once again rises from the grave to invade the dreams of Springwood's children. However, with only three kids remaining (Kristen, Joey and Kincaid from "Nightmare 3"), Freddy needs to find a way to reach out and touch the souls of all the untapped children whose parents weren't a part of Krueger's mortal murder. Through Kristen, Freddy gains access to Alice Johnson's (Lisa Wilcox) dreams and opens up a whole new nightmarish world of possibilities. Director Renny Harlin ("Die Hard 2", "Cliffhanger") brings a lot of flair to this third "Nightmare" sequel which securely picks up where "Dream Warriors" left off. The lame, almost miscast Patricia Arquette is gone from the role of Kristen Parker. Replacing her is the highly commendable (not to mention extraordinarily cute) Tuesday Knight who also performs the opening song to this movie. Returning cast members Ken Sagoes and (particularly) Rodney Eastman have matured comfortably in their roles as Kincaid and Joey respectively. Newcomer Andras Jones (as Rick Johnson) is a nice addition to the new teenage cast, bringing with him a light-hearted cockiness that's appealing, but Lisa Wilcox steals the show. She owns this movie with her startling transformation from mousy introvert to confident demon stalker. Robert Englund, having played Freddy in all three previous entries, doesn't even have to exert himself to pull off a wonderful performance. Portraying the character of Freddy has become second nature to Englund and he delivers the goods in style. Viewers even have the chance to see him out of the Freddy make-up again in this film. Instead of showing up as a bus driver, however, he shows up as a school nurse...a female school nurse. There's a little more humor in this film than there was in the others, but it's a welcome addition to the formula. One touch that can be distracting is the lighting for this film. Often times, it makes the movie resemble a comic book instead of a dark world of slumber and fear. But the screenplay is engrossing enough to keep Freddy fans happy. Even the score will reel movie fans in. Composer Craig Safan offers up the best musical background since Charles Bernstein's original, always remaining true to his source material. Trivia buffs take note: in the first cemetery sequence, viewers are given the opportunity to see both Nancy Thompson and her father's tombstones. This is a brilliant piece of extra continuity that ties "Nightmare 4" to parts one and three. Also, after Alice falls asleep in the movie theater and gets sucked through the screen, pay particular attention to the applauding audience. The audience is comprised of all the teenagers who died in the film up to that point. Overall, this film has a late eighties feel to it that adds a nostalgic flourish to an already gratifying production. Long time fans of the series will find much to love about this film and the more casual viewer looking for a good time won't be let down either.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: There is a sparkling 1.85:1 widescreen transfer of the film that is a majestic sight to behold. The presentation is so clear that you can see the match head inside of the flame Kristen uses to light her cigarette. Outdoor locations appear so realistic that it's easy to feel you're looking through a window instead of watching a movie. The accompanying 5.1 surround sound is the best to date on any of the "Nightmare" DVDs. Every clanking chain and piece of shattering glass has its own unique sound and they are all bright, well separated manifestations. This disc also includes the original stereo audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the movie. Not surprisingly, this is another paper case from New Line. The front is a miniaturized recreation of the original theatrical poster while the rest of the case is devoid of any artwork. The inside highlights the list of special features and the twenty-seven chapter stops which make up this ninety minute movie. The DVD itself has been painted with a picture of a shadowed Freddy Krueger standing in a smoky backlit area. Special features for this disc include the "Jump to a Nightmare" option. There's also a brief but enlightening cast and crew section taken from the original theatrical press kit for the film. DVD-ROM users can also view the interactive screenplay for the film, they can play the fourth "Dream World" trivia game and they can visit up-to-the-minute weblinks.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to make your way out of the maze of cars in the junkyard before Freddy slices and dices you than you are of finding easter eggs on this one.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: During Joey's dream sequence, the pin-up girl (Hope Marie Carlton appearing as herself) hanging on his wall disappears off the poster where she resided and pops up underneath the lining of his waterbed. We're treated to a lovely view of her breasts before she sinks back down into the watery depths. Later in the film, one of the girls (Linnea Quigley) trapped in Freddy's chest of souls bares her breasts, but that's more of a disturbing visual rather than an enticing one.

    THE GORE REPORT: There's some mild gore early on in this film when Freddy is resurrected in the car junkyard. His bones reattach themselves and then his blood, tendons and muscles start to reform over those bones. Another segment of interest for the gore hounds comes later in the movie when Freddy turns one of the teenagers into a giant cockroach. Markedly grand is when her face is ripped off to reveal the roach head while she's trapped in Freddy's roach motel.

    SAY AGAIN: "Welcome to Wonderland, Alice." - Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund)

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this DVD. This is a prime example of late eighties horror and Freddy fanatics won't be able to get enough of Krueger's wry witticisms and uniquely inventive death scenes. As part of the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set, it is indispensable. Separately, this film represents a culmination of the terror, sarcasm and characterization "Nightmare" followers demand.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Love Kills" Performed By Vinnie Vincent Invasion. "Angel" Performed By Love/Hate. "Don't Be Afraid of Your Dreams" Performed By Go West. "Back to the Wall" Performed By Divinyls. "Fatal Charm" Performed By Billy Idol. "In the Flesh" Performed By Blondie. "Anything, Anything" Performed By Dramarama. "Nightmare" Performed By Tuesday Knight. "Are You Ready For Freddy?" Performed By the Fat Boys. "Baila Baila (Dance With Me)" Performed By Girl Talk. "Pride and Joy" Performed By Joe Lamont. "Rebuilding the Big House" Performed By Nick Gilder. "Therapist" Performed By Vigil. "Under the Night Stars" Performed By Sea Hags. "Standing Over You" Performed By the Angels From Angel City. "I Want Your (Hands on Me)" Performed By Sinead O'Connor With MC Lyte. Soundtrack Available on Chrysalis Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records. Score Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records.

    4-0 out of 5 stars One of the series' strongest threads
    The Dream Master is only a slight improvement over the superb Dream Warriors, but it delivers fantastic special effects and creative death scenes. Best scene: Debbie's demise. Very gruesome, and it finishes with a good Freddy one-liner: "You can check in, but you can't check out", in reference to a roach motel (you know, one of those little cardboard boxes with adhesive on the floor) which he promptly crushes in his fist.

    The DVD has a superb digital transfer, and an extremely impressive 5.1 track which is really hard on the bass effects. It's a 1988 film, yet it looks and sounds like it was made in 1998. A vast improvement over the first three DVDs.

    Overall, it's a very strong sequel with a great director (Renny Harlin) at the helm. 4 stars for the movie, 5 stars for the DVD.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best one of the whole series!!
    I really think that this movie is so strong i can watch it the whole day and i don't get tired of watching it.
    It's a very good movie , for me is the best of the series because is developes strong characters that fight against freddy krueger in a strongly way , i recommend it 100% good! ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630874
    Sales Rank: 16486
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $11.98

    A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 - The Dream Child
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $13.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (102)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Somewhat pathetic sequel to great long running series
    A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child is the fifth installment in the series, and let me tell you it is considered by most to be the worst in the long runnin NOES horror saga. The film involves the Child Murderer turned Demonic Killer, Freddy Kreuger, wants to be reborn again into the real world not to long after being defeated in NOES 4: The Dream Master. He's using the dreams of Alice' (the heroine of the previous film) unborn baby to be reborn again to into the real world. It's up to Kreuger's mother to stop him before this happens, and all hell breaks loose again. The film is to dark, there's only kills in the entire film, and Freddy is not terrifying or even slightly scary, in fact he really sucks in this one.

    Freddy has made the a complete transistion from being the most Sadistic and evil villian of time, to being a wise-ass comedian in this film. You should see the death sequences in this film, their ridiculous, there not even funny, and the one-liners are beyond idiotic. I think Steven Hopkins, is a great director, I mean directed Predator, which is spectacular SciFi/Action/Horror movies, but suddenly like a year later he directs this garbage, come on Hopkins. There are three ridiculous not-funny death sequences in this film; one involves a wealthy white girl who is this very fancy upscale dinner party event, what she realize though is that one waiters, Fred is actually Freddy Krueger in disguise, she ends up getting her own guts feed to her, and chokes to death, that scene is disgusting, it's not funny, and not scary. Another involves a Alice's boyfriend Dan, who gets his body merged with a motorcycle, not scary, and not funny either, just ridiculous. The last death in the movie is Freddy kills a young man, putting him in a comic book, and then slashing it, the writer of this film expects that to be funny, well it's not. Here's my rating of the worst NOES sequel.

    PLOT: The plot actually pretty good, and it's really the only thing I like and find interesting about this film. NOES 5, is one of the most dramatic films in the series, but it doesn't come close to the Dream Master, or Dream Warriors. 7/10

    GORE: Not very much gore at all in this Film, if any gore at all. Freddy is much more of a pervert in this film, instead of being a sadistic ,terrifying ,dark ,demonic ,horror slasher murderer, like he was in the previous entries. His kills in this film are not entertaining, their disgusting, and downright lame.
    3/10

    BODY COUNT: Lowest in the series, Freddy only kills three victims, in this film, did I mention this film really sucks. 2/10

    NUDITY: There is no nudity in this film

    OVERALL RATING: 5/10

    Not a great rating for a NOES film, but that's what this film deserves, it sucks, am no saying Steven Hopkins is bad director, he's not, but he should have done a different not this one. Really don't buy this film, unless you planning to collect the whole NOES series, because this film is not worth your money, it's the worst film in the series, by far. If want a really want and entertaining Freddy film, and worth your money by Dream Warriors, The Dream Master, The Original Nightmare on Elm Street, or New Nightmare, these are the best Freddy films. The picture quality of this film is excellent, of course, and so is the sound. This is the worst entry in the series, PERIOD.

    3-0 out of 5 stars A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: Dream Child (3 and 1/2 Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Robert Englund, Lisa Wilcox, Kelly Jo Minter, Danny Hassel, Erika Anderson, Nick Mele, Joe Seely, Valorie Armstrong, Burr DeBenning, Clarence Felder, Ted Nugent, George P. Wilbur (Stunts). Score Composed By Jay Ferguson. Co-Produced By Robert Shaye. Directed By Stephen Hopkins. (R) For Mild Violence, Very Mild Gore, Profanity, Brief Nudity and Very Mild Sexual Content; 89m.; 1989.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: Alice Johnson (Lisa Wilcox) thought she had rid Springwood of Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) for good after their climactic showdown in the abandoned dream church. But now the dreams have started to come back, although they've taken a new form. Alice is surprised to find she doesn't have to be asleep to witness the rebirth of Freddy. It seems that Freddy has invaded the dreams of her unborn child. Now, almost completely defenseless, Alice and her newly graduated friends have to face the terror and find a way to ensure Freddy won't harm anyone else. While this is a good entry into the long running series, things did begin to fall apart. Robert Englund returns to the role he made famous and it's clear he still relishes portraying Freddy. He's seen once again without the Krueger make-up as well, this time as one of the asylum inmates in Alice's first dream. The new teenaged cast members play their parts admirably, but they can't hold a candle to the ones from either "Nightmare 3" or "Nightmare 4". Erika Anderson seems a bit distracted in her role as Greta Gibson. Kelly Jo Minter doesn't have the screen presence or the acting chops to successfully play such a pivotal role as Yvonne. She's just not believable enough as Alice's best friend and confidant (although she does fill out a swimsuit quite nicely). Joe Seely is the best of the new bunch, playing the half sarcastic, half sweet comic book artist Mark. Other new cast members include Beatrice Boepple as a young Amanda Krueger, but she's nowhere near as convincing in the role as Nan Martin was as the aged Amanda in "Nightmare 3". It's unfortunate that such a bland actress plays such an integral part in this film's bizarre finale. Then there's the youngster of the group, child actor Whitby Hertford, who plays Alice's unborn son Jacob. He turns in a fine performance but other child actors have shown much more promise, including Miko Hughes who would play Heather Langenkamp's son in "Wes Craven's New Nightmare" five years later. Returning actor Danny Hassel hasn't grown in his role of Dan Jordan which leaves the viewer feeling a little cheated when compared to Lisa Wilcox's brave, deepening understanding of her character Alice. Another hindrance to the film are the death scenes. There seem to be fewer of them and they're spaced dramatically farther apart than they were in previous "Nightmare" movies. They're too over-the-top to be fully enjoyable, ostensibly the filmmakers were trying to out-do previous entries and weren't concentrating on creating solid entertainment. One death scene, however, is a great mock-up of "Nightmare 4"'s comic book approach to the series. The specific death scene actually transports one of the teenagers into a real life black and white comic book. A final drawback to the film are the overly symbolic sets and the lack of Freddy's innate brutality. Too many religious and birth-related designs and an exceedingly talkative Freddy hurt "Nightmare 5" more than anything else, but at least it doesn't denigrate itself to the level of "Freddy's Revenge". On the plus side, Jay Ferguson delivers a wonderful score that remains true to the dark underpinnings of its source material and Stephen Hopkins' direction keeps things at a brisk pace. Trivia buffs take note: there are two noteworthy happenings in Mark's room over the course of the movie. The first one finds the camera passing a television which is showing an interview program. One of the people waiting to be interviewed is rock star Ted Nugent. The other occurrence arrives when the camera pans across a line of comic books on the floor, which create a trail leading to a stretched out Mark. Look very closely and you'll see that one of the comic books has a fiery orange cover with a brown monstrosity on it. It appears to have been the inspiration for the "Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday" video cover. Overall, this sequel weakens under its attempts to be bigger and better than its two predecessors. Fortunately, there are still enough stylish moments to warrant a few repeat viewings and true Freddy fans will relish the opportunity to see their favorite slasher hacking his way through another sequel.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: As with other entries in New Line's "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set, this film has a 1.85:1 widescreen transfer. This one is a bit darker than its predecessor, but that doesn't make it any less clear or enjoyable. Though slight remnants of grain appear from time to time, the cumulative effect is stunning. The color tones for this film are more reminiscent of those used in "Nightmare 3" which adds to the artistry of the film. The accompanying 5.1 surround sound is less veracious than the classic "Nightmare 4" surround sound. Instead of being all encompassing, it feels more like an afterthought. Its booming tension seems to have very little resonance, serving only to deafen rather than define. This disc also includes the original stereo audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the movie. New Line had an affinity for paper cases in the early years of DVD and this title is no exception. The front cover is a miniature version of the original theatrical poster. The rest of the case is devoid of any artwork. The inside of this case displays a list of the special features and the twenty-three chapter stops for this ninety minute movie. The DVD itself has been painted with a backlit photograph of Freddy Krueger holding up his razor-tipped glove. Special features include the now standard "Jump to a Nightmare" option. There's also an in-depth cast and crew section taken from the original theatrical press kit. DVD-ROM users are also treated to an interactive screenplay, the fifth installment in the "Dream World" trivia game and up-to-the-minute weblinks.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to survive a reading of the "Nightmare From Hell" comic book than you are of finding easter eggs on this one.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: In the opening moments of this film, we are treated to Alice Johnson's character nude behind a glass shower door (which partially obstructs the view). Unfortunately, the body doesn't belong to beautiful Lisa Wilcox, only to good-looking body doubles. Although, fans of Lisa's beautiful buns will be pleased to see she spends the majority of the film in tight fitting jeans with ample camera angles devoted to displaying her delectable derriere.

    THE GORE REPORT: In an early dream sequence from the film, Freddy uses some bad champagne to burn his arm off. He then uses that detached limb as a seatbelt in Dan Jordan's truck. To go along with that fairly gory moment, there are only three potentially intriguing death scenes. Sadly, they're all overblown and don't feature anything that would qualify as substantial gore.

    SAY AGAIN: "It's a boy!" - Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) upon being reborn.

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this DVD. As a part of the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set, it's a welcome addition. Separately, there's still enough titillation for horror fans to get their rocks off. While it will never equal the legacy of the original film (or parts three and four), this is still a valid entry in the series.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter" Performed By Bruce Dickinson. "Heaven in the Back Seat" Performed By Romeo's Daughter. "Can't Take the Hurt" Performed By Mammoth. "Savage" Performed By W.A.S.P. "Now I Lay Me Down" Performed By Samantha Fox. "Let's Go" Performed By Kool Moe Dee. "Word Up Doc!" Performed By Doctor Ice. "Livin' in the Jungle" Performed By Schoolly D. Soundtrack Available on Jive Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records. Score Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records.

    3-0 out of 5 stars FREDDY FATIGUE
    The fifth entry in the venerable Freddy Krueger franchise shows our bad guy starting to seem tired.It's understandable in some ways:How can we bring Freddy back this time?And how do we send him off this time?And how many more imaginative ways can we kill off the teenagers?Stephen Hopkins (Ghost and the Darkness, Under Suspicion) is the director, and to his credit, he does give us a surrealistic, dreamlike feel.Unfortunately, the script is a little garrulous and the acting of some of the supporting characters (most noteably Mark, the comic book freak) is not up to the movie's previous standards.Lisa Wilcox tries gamely to continue the heroic efforts of Alice, but she becomes whiny and self-centered at times.Danny Hassel is back as the sensitive jock Dan, but not for long, folks.Even Robert Englund seems a little disinterested, and his one liners aren't as fresh as they had been up to this point.
    THE NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET franchise is a powerful one in the horror genre; but by this time, it started to become repetitive, derivative, and not as entertaining.There's only so many ways to kill in dreams, and the resuscitation gimmicks to bring Freddy back were starting to get more preposterous.I've watched the first five in a row, and with only two more to go, I'm hoping that they can find some of the grotesque brilliance of the first four. ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630882
    Sales Rank: 22422
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $13.47

    Freddy's Dead - The Final Nightmare
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $11.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
    US | Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (119)

    3-0 out of 5 stars Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare (Three Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Robert Englund, Lisa Zane, Shon Greenblatt, Lezlie Deane, Ricky Dean Logan, Breckin Meyer, Yaphet Kotto, Roseanne Arnold, Tom Arnold, Alice Cooper, Robert Shaye, Johnny Depp. Co-Casting By Jane Jenkins (C.S.A.). Co-Casting By Janet Hirshenson (C.S.A.). Score Composed By Brian May. Co-Produced By Robert Shaye. Story Written and Directed By Rachel Talalay. (R) For Violence, Mild Gore, Profanity, Drug Use and Very Mild Sexual Content; 89m.; 1991.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: The population of Springwood, Ohio, has decreased rapidly in the last ten years. In fact, it has decreased so rapidly that only one teenager remains in the entire town. Now, the evil dream stalker Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is sending that teenager out into the world to bring him back a way to escape his Springwood boundaries and invade the nightmares of teenagers everywhere. Right off the bat, viewers venturing into this film get a different feel to it than prior entries in the series. Long time series' collaborator (and former producer) Rachel Talalay takes over the reins as director for this installment and brings with her a wealth of Freddy knowledge. However, all that knowledge can't make this film more than what it is...a nice attempt to finish off the series that amounts to nothing more than wasted opportunities. The production is adequate enough, while the late Australian composer Brian May (not the legendary guitarist for the band Queen) delivers an average score as the backdrop. The haunting original "Nightmare" theme only appears once in the latter half of the presentation while the rest of the music seems quite tame by horror movie standards. The cast is where this production really starts to come apart. Robert Englund returns as Freddy for the sixth time, but even he can't save the show. He's more of a ham in this film than he's ever been. Those who thought the teenagers for "Nightmare 5" were taken from the bottom of the barrel had yet to see the ones acting in "Freddy's Dead". Lezlie Deane is too uptight in her role as Tracy, using only two different facial expressions throughout the film. Ricky Dean Logan is too ineffectual as Carlos and Breckin Meyer (as Spencer), while entertaining enough, barely exhibits any of the promise that would turn him into a classic comedy star almost a decade later (in "Road Trip"). Shon Greenblatt tries hard to make his John Doe role the central focus of the film, but he doesn't have enough talent to do so. One of the major flaws in choosing these actors lies in the script itself. All of the teens have deep seated parental issues. Tracy was molested by her father, Carlos was permanently impaired by his mother, Spencer has an overbearing father who wants his son to follow his exact footsteps. The filmmakers made short-sighted casting choices, apparently deciding to use teens who looked nice on film, not ones who could actually bring the angst and heartache of their characters to life. Unfortunately, these casting choices also applied to Lisa Zane. She brings as much charm to the role of counselor Maggie as she can, however the pivotal role is beyond her grasp as an actress. Only veteran actor Yaphet Kotto truly understands what's going on and his character Doc doesn't get half the screen time he deserves. Another problem with the script, one carried over from "Nightmare 5", are the death scenes. Instead of going for scary, the filmmakers went for comical and tried to literally blend the lunacy of Freddy Krueger with the off-the-wall antics of "Looney Tunes". The only scene it works in is the one where Spencer gets sucked into Freddy's video game. The brightest beacons of hope come in the form of the uncredited guest stars. Producer Robert Shaye has a brief role as the bus clerk who gives John his ticket out of town. "Nightmare 1" alumnus Johnny Depp pops up in a commercial ("This is your brain, this is your brain on drugs...") before being whacked in the head by Freddy's frying pan. Most notably, however, is metal god Alice Cooper's too brief portrayal of Krueger's stepfather. The only miscalculation is the inclusion of Tom and Roseanne Arnold. They provide what can only be considered the most irritating comic relief in the history of horror. It's even hard for the three teenagers who share the screen with the Arnolds not to laugh at their miserable acting abilities. Overall, this film tries to add new twists and epigrammatic humor to what was quickly becoming a tired series. Some parts of the story work, but most will only get on viewer's nerves.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: There is a 1.85:1 widescreen presentation for this film which is marginally enjoyable, however it's nothing special when compared to other entries in the series. Some of the outdoor locations appear a little hazy and there are slight moments of grain which pop up here and there. For the most part, color levels are even and the definition is sharp. The accompanying 5.1 surround sound, on the other hand, is a grand return to the powerful rumblings of the surround heard on "Nightmare 4". Gone are the insignificant, toneless boomings of part five, replaced by sharp, crisp digital sound that will shake the earth beneath your seat. Lightning storms are unusually startling. This disc also includes the original stereo audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the movie. New Line has packaged this disc in a paper case that features a miniaturized replica of the theatrical poster on its cover. The rest of the case is devoid of any artwork. The inside of this case highlights the special features list and the twenty-three chapter stops that make up this ninety minute movie. The DVD itself is painted with a photograph of Freddy Krueger displaying his razor-sharp claws on a slightly yellowed background. Special features include the obligatory "Jump to a Nightmare" option. There's also a fairly informative cast and crew section taken from the original theatrical press kit. DVD-ROM users can also access an interactive screenplay, play the sixth "Dream World" trivia game and view up-to-the-minute weblinks. However, the best special feature on the entire "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set is housed on this DVD. It's the inclusion of the original 3-D ending to the film. Viewers can still watch the ending in a normal viewing mode, however those who watch the 3-D version are treated to a supreme novelty that never wears thin and actually bolsters the enjoyment level of the movie. True, it can be a bit distracting in places, but it's a fresh and innovative way of seeing Freddy. However, to my knowledge, only the DVD included in the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" has the 3-D viewing option. Those sold outside of the box do not.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to beat Freddy at his own video game than you are of finding easter eggs on this one.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: The film falls short in this department. There's virtually no stimulation whatsoever in this film and that's rare for the "Nightmare" series. Usually, you can find one shining beacon of sexuality in the films, but not in this one.

    THE GORE REPORT: There's a scant trace of gore when amnesiac John (Shon Greenblatt) confronts his physical memory in one of his dream sequences but it's nothing glamorous. One teenager's head explodes but there's surprisingly little gore. One of the teenagers drops out of the sky and falls on a bed of spikes. That's about the bloodiest moment in the movie.

    SAY AGAIN: "I'll get you, my pretty and your little soul, too!" - Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund)

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this DVD. This is a perfect definition of a "hit or miss" affair. While it falls flat on most accounts, fans of the "Nightmare" films will still want to own this slice of cinematic history. Let's face it, it's not as abysmal as the "Freddy's Revenge" bomb and those who own the 3-D version encased in the boxed set own not only the film, but a piece of silver screen history. "Freddy's Dead" was the last big screen horror movie (to date) that utilized the 3-D format.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Why Was I Born? (Freddy's Dead)" Performed By Iggy Pop. "You Know What I Mean" Performed By the Goo Goo Dolls. "Two Days in February" Performed By the Goo Goo Dolls. "I'm Awake Now" Performed By the Goo Goo Dolls. "Hold Me Down" Performed By Johnny Law. "Treat 'Em Right" Performed By Chubb Rock. "Remember the Night" Performed By Johnny Law. "Everything Remains the Same" Performed By the Junk Monkeys. "Give Me a Beat" Performed By Young Lords. "Nothing Left to Say" Performed By Fates Warning. "In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida" Performed By Iron Butterfly. Soundtrack Available on Metal Blade Compact Discs, Cassettes and Records. Score Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs and Cassettes.

    1-0 out of 5 stars The worst NOES film. Period.
    It was the worst installment to me. I am a Freddy fan, but I did not like this one, it only had like 3 kills and it was boring. I did enjoy the video game scene, that was the most interesting part of the movie.

    2-0 out of 5 stars R.I.P. OFF
    What a shame for what had been a darned good franchise that this lame and discombobulated movie had originally been planned as the last Freddy movie.Why did they take it ten years into the future?Why did they wait six movies to tell us that Freddy Krueger had his own daughter and that he had killed his wife?And what a mistake..Freddy says he started killing the Elm Street kids because they took his daughter away from him, but he had actually already started killing kids anyway?Director Rachel Talalay brings no imagination in her command of this poorly conceived and executed entry.Lisa Zane sleepwalks through her role, and there are times she's actually funny when she isn't supposed to be.And frankly I got tired of another kickboxing chick (limply played by Lezlie Deane).Yaphet Kotto must have needed a paycheck, and even though Robert Englund's Freddy has more screen time, he's not as enjoyable in this one.We get cameos from Alice Cooper, Roseanne Barr and Tom Arnold, and a young Breckin Meyer (Garfield, Rat Race) as the ponytailed Spencer.Once again the male teens get offed first and its up to our brave females to save the day.Reverse discrimination?And more obtrusive music which did nothing to advance the plot.And has it finally dawned on us that all the kids come from dysfunctional families?Are there no normal families in Elm Street's world?All in all, not a worthy entry, but at least the next and final "Elm Street" (Not counting Freddy vs. Jason), Wes Craven's New Nightmare brought back some of the franchise's best points.Watch only if you are an Elm Street afficionado and want to say you've seen them all! ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630890
    Sales Rank: 17587
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $11.98

    Wes Craven's New Nightmare
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (03 February, 2004)
    list price: $14.97 -- our price: $13.47
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    English-professor-turned-horror-auteur Wes Craven brings both careers to play in this ingenious reinterpretation of the Nightmare on Elm Street series as a modern-day fairy tale--a sort of Hansel and Gretel for big kids. Heather Langenkamp, star of the original film, plays Heather Langenkamp, an actress and mother wracked with nightmares as Los Angeles is rocked with unexplained earthquakes. Meanwhile, her son starts sleepwalking and croaking Freddy Krueger threats. Is it a coincidence that Wes Craven (playing himself) is turning his own troubled dreams into a new screenplay, which he calls "a sort of nightmare in progress"? According to his visions, the imaginary Freddy has become the embodiment of ancient evil and is trying to break out of his movie prison and into the physical world. It's a rather literal and glib explanation, but words have never been Craven's strong suit. His central thesis, the cultural importance of stories, is more resonant in the web of imagery arising from dreams, movies, and the subconscious. Robert Englund and John Saxon play themselves and their movie characters (though this Freddy is decidedly less wisecracking and more demonic). It's a thoughtful, imaginative, and often gripping modern horror film that echoes with suggestions of The Exorcist and Poltergeist. Though less of a fun-house thrill ride than previous Nightmares, it's scarier and smarter than any of the other series sequels.--Sean Axmaker ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Closed-captioned
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (149)

    4-0 out of 5 stars Wes Craven's New Nightmare (Four Stars)
    This review refers to the edition found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Robert Englund, Heather Langenkamp, Miko Hughes, David Newsom, Tracy Middendorf, Fran Bennett, John Saxon, Wes Craven, Robert Shaye, Nick Corri, Tuesday Knight, Lin Shaye. Score Composed By J. Peter Robinson. Co-Executive Produced By Robert Shaye. Based on Characters Created By, Co-Executive Produced, Written and Directed By Wes Craven. (R) For Violence, Gore and Profanity; 112m.; 1994.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: For the tenth anniversary of the "Nightmare" film series, director Wes Craven returned to the helm to deliver what is possibly the best sequel of the sextet that followed the original film. It seems that Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) is an ancient entity that Wes himself captured in the form of his "Nightmare on Elm Street" screenplay. But now that the "Elm Street" series has died off, the ancient evil is looking for a way out. It's taken a liking to the Freddy form and wants to cross over from the silver screen into our reality. In order to do that, it has to have a climactic confrontation with Nancy Thompson, the first person to humiliate him on film. That means Heather Langenkamp must stand up to the hideously evil entity and play her most famous character one final time. Only instead of battling to see who wins the movie, she must battle to save her existence. This film presents the viewer with the age old adage of life imitating art imitating life. The original "Nightmare" film was based on reality, turning newspaper clippings into the basis for a screenplay. This film takes that screenplay and places it back in the non-fictional world. Horror purists will find a lot to treasure about this film. For starters, it's interesting to see some of your favorite cast members (Heather Langenkamp, John Saxon) and crew members (Wes Craven, Robert Shaye) portraying themselves. It's also incredibly fun to watch Robert Englund work his magic. He not only portrays himself in this film, but he's given the opportunity to bring Freddy to life twice. Once as the Freddy fans are used to seeing in the films (during a surprise television interview), then as the darker, more malevolent Freddy that wants to cross over. Both versions of Freddy have decidedly different appearances and both give Englund the chance to further outline the menacing evil he made so famous. The rest of the cast also falls into place better than expected. David Newsom is convincing as Heather's "real life" husband Chase Porter while veteran child actor Miko Hughes (as Heather's son Dylan) gives a performance that almost rivals the one he delivered in "Pet Sematary" five years earlier. Tracy Middendorf is another good addition to the film, bringing some warmth and charm to her role as Dylan's babysitter Julie. Another fascinating extension to the film is the inclusion of classic lines and situations from other "Nightmare" films ("You are all my children now", "Screw your pass", the quicksand stairs, the original Elm Street exterior, the Freddy phone that licked Nancy in the first movie, etc.). Seeing them in these different contexts adds a new dimension to the film. The filmmakers even placed Heather's grey streak on the correct side of her head (the left side) in this outing, as opposed to the miraculous modification witnessed in "Nightmare 3". But outside of the cast and the story, this film is also buoyed by the talent behind the screen. Wes Craven is always a masterful director who knows how to frame each scene perfectly and properly pace each tense moment. J. Peter Robinson's score is probably the best since the original. He briefly honors the Charles Bernstein themes while creating a whole new atmosphere to accompany the terror. The set designs for the final battle were created with care and commitment. All of these elements combine to form one unforgettable film, the last Krueger carnage fans would bear witness to until his grand return in "Freddy vs. Jason" a decade later. Trivia buffs take note: this is the only film whose final credits feature the in-joke of Freddy Krueger appearing as himself. Also, both Nick Corri (Rod from "Nightmare 1") and Tuesday Knight (Kristen from "Nightmare 4") appear in the grave side sequence of the film (only Corri gets a close-up however). Overall, Wes Craven has fashioned a deliciously terrifying bridge between the subconscious horrors of the silver screen and the struggle of reality that waits beyond. Fans who may have been disappointed by the excesses of "Nightmare 5" and "Freddy's Dead" won't want to overlook this gem.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: The 1.85:1 widescreen transfer that appears on this DVD is clean and precise, showing very little grain. Colors are well separated and black levels are where they should be for a film of this nature. The 5.1 surround sound is mastered at a very healthy level. So healthy, in fact, that I actually had to turn the sound down twenty notches below previous "Nightmare" films just to save my hearing from the onslaught. The multi-directional effects, particularly in the earthquake and the highway sequences, are more fully realized than on any of the other "Nightmare" DVDs. This disc also includes the original stereo audio track for the film and easy to read English subtitles which are placed within the frame of the movie. As with the other six entries in the series, New Line has packaged this DVD in a paper case. The front cover is a gothic painted representation of Freddy Krueger's eyes. The remainder of the case is devoid of artwork. The inside of this case highlights the special features list and the twenty-nine chapter stops that make up this almost two hour presentation. The DVD itself has been painted with a photograph (taken at a distance) of Freddy dressed in his new black trenchcoat. Special features for this DVD include the standard "Jump to a Nightmare" option. There's also a brief but informative cast and crew section taken from the original theatrical press kit. DVD-ROM users also have access to the now obligatory interactive screenplay, the seventh "Dream World" trivia game and up-to-the-minute weblinks. But the biggest extra on this disc, as it was with "Nightmare 1", is the commentary track by director Wes Craven. The commentary proves that Craven can be a very dry, long-winded speaker, but he tries his best to be insightful and entertaining. Still, the bouncy presence of Heather Langenkamp (who appeared on the commentary for the original film) is sorely missed. Craven does describe, in length, some behind the scenes tidbits such as the alternate earthquake opening he wanted to shoot for the film and the parallels that existed between Langenkamp's on screen personal life and her actual personal life. He also makes his feelings known in regards to how his Krueger character was treated throughout the series, voicing his opinion that other filmmakers transitioned Freddy into a buffoon and basically disregarded the psychological roots that were supposed to ground the series.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. You're more likely to find a way out of Freddy's hellish underworld by following a trail of bread crumbs than you are of finding easter eggs on this one.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: There's one moment in this film when Heather Langenkamp races to catch her falling son and we have the opportunity to see her gorgeous breasts bouncing in her shirt. You also get an extraordinarily brief upskirt of Heather when she falls out of bed after a nasty dream involving her son and some kitchen knives.

    THE GORE REPORT: In the opening moments of the film, one of Wes Craven's crew members fakes cutting off his own hand. There's some fairly realistic looking blood effects during that moment. Later in the film, one girl gets dragged up the ceiling by Freddy and leaves a nice trail of gore behind her. There are a few other gory sequences, but most of the blood is beyond the center of attention.

    SAY AGAIN: "I guess evil never dies, right?" - Robert Shaye

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this DVD. This is an intelligent, thinking man's horror film. People looking for the fluff that adorned the last few "Nightmare" films should look elsewhere. The overt humor from the last few films is gone, replaced by sheer psychological terror and the logical staples that imbued the original film with such frightening appeal. Today's moviegoers have been trained to react to outrageous special effects and over-the-top amounts of bloodletting. While this film still has both of those traits (in moderation), its refreshing to find it relies more on mind-numbing suspense as its key component. Unfortunately, suspense is something today's horror fans know precious little about.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: Score Available on Milan Compact Discs and Cassettes.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best sequel to NOES (besides Dream Warriors)
    It was a wonderfully scary look in the great mind of Wes Craven on "What would happen if the nightmare was real?" I loved this movie. This is by far one of the best Freddy sequels ever made! It had a great plot, unlike most of the sequels! It is a true eye catcher down to the very end!

    4-0 out of 5 stars FRACTURED FAIRY TALE
    After the abysmal FREDDY'S DEAD, Wes Craven must have thought, "Somehow I've got to leave the NOES fans with something a little classier than that."He ingeniously decided to morph reel life and real life in bringing us a mature Heather Langenkamp playing herself, with Robert Englund, John Saxon and several "non-acting" professionals, such as Craven himself in featured roles.Langenkamp's return is an enormous asset to the film, and Craven wisely leaves out the obnoxious rock or rap songs that had nothing to do with the plot, and lets J. Peter Robinson's "movie" score add so much atmosphere.This film also has more of the "nightmarish" quality of the original, and with its unique plotting and satisfying ending, it becomes the second best entry in the seven movie series.Thank you Mr. Craven for giving Freddy a dignified death, at least in the original franchise. ... Read more

    Asin: 0780630904
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $13.47

    The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    DVD (17 August, 2004)
    list price: $99.97 -- our price: $79.98
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    In the trinity of modern horror films, there's the father (Michael Myers of Halloween), the son (Jason of Friday the 13th fame, a knockoff), and the unholy spirit, Freddy Krueger of the Nightmare on Elm Street films. The spectral man who haunted the nightmares of unsuspecting teenagers with deadly consequences, Freddy (as played by Robert Englund) was a truly frightening bogeyman and icon for the '80s. Unlike the hockey-masked Jason, who dispatched horny teenagers with mechanical and monotonous ease (he never talked, never took off his mask), Freddy was a truly creative and diabolical villain, with a sadistic and blackly funny personality. The hallmarks of the Nightmare on Elm Street series were imaginatively gruesome suspense pieces, set in the overactive imaginations of the teen victims. The first film of the series, Wes Craven's truly intelligent and scary film, was so hugely successful it begat not one, not two, but six more sequels, each pretty much diluting the originality and horror of its predecesor. (Horror fans will fondly remember Drew Barrymore's assertion in Scream that the first Nightmare film was great but all the rest sucked.) Still, there's fun to be had in the remaining films in the series, seeing as a number of aspiring filmmakers cut their teeth on the continuing saga of Freddy. Frank Darabont (The Shawshank Redemption) and Chuck Russell (The Mask) worked on the third installment, Dream Warriors (starring a young Patricia Arquette), and Renny Harlin (Die Hard 2) came to prominence with the ingeniously macabre fourth film, The Dream Master, coscripted by Brian Helgeland (L.A. Confidential). Craven and original star Heather Langenkamp did return for the last film, New Nightmare, which presaged the tongue-in-cheek postmodernism of the Scream films and resharpened Freddy's ability to scare. --Mark Englehart ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Widescreen
    • Box set
    Reviews (198)

    5-0 out of 5 stars ONE! TWO! FREDDY COMING FOR YOU!!!!!!!
    One two freddy coming for you and he can't wait to be added in your dvd collection!!!! This boxset is awesome it has all seven nightmare movies and a bonus disc where you can go through this maze and it has a lot of awesome extras. I love all the movies,because they are classic especially the first one and they all have great cast of characters within the movies!!!! If you love freddy then you should buy this for your collection it is worth every penny!!!!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars The Nightmare Series Encyclopedia (Three and a Half Stars)
    This review refers to the bonus disc found in New Line Cinema's "The Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set.

    THE WHO'S WHO: Starring Wes Craven, Robert Shaye, Sean Cunningham, Heather Langenkamp, Robert Englund, John Saxon, Rachel Talalay, Jack Sholder, Kevin Yagher, Dick Cavett, Chuck Russell, Frank Darabont, Dokken, Patricia Arquette, Renny Harlin, John Carl Buechler, Stephen Hopkins, The Fat Boys, Whodini, Clive Barker. (NR) Contains Very Mild Violence, Mild Profanity, Very Mild Gore, Very Brief Nudity and Mild Sexual Content; 240m.; 1999. Cumulative information for the film series as a whole includes an (R) rating for violence, gore, profanity, drug content, nudity and mild sexual content; 655m.; 1984-1994. The overall rating for the films included in this boxed set is four stars. For individual reviews of each film, please see separate titles.

    WHAT'S GOING ON IN HERE?: Consummate "Nightmare on Elm Street" fans will be delighted by the inclusion of an eighth bonus disc as part of the series' boxed set. The central focus of this DVD is a "Labyrinth" video game, but all of the important documentary material that can be uncovered within the labyrinth is found on the index of the disc itself. However, the "Labyrinth" is the only place to uncover humorous outtakes and comedy interactions with Freddy Krueger. The bonus disc begins with the "Welcome to Primetime" (46:26) segment. Relevant members of the cast and crew for the original "Nightmare" film talk about the newspaper clippings that inspired the screenplay, how producer Robert Shaye was the only person who believed in director Wes Craven's script and how the original idea of Freddy Krueger was supposed to have him portrayed by a sixty or seventy year old man. Makeup man David Miller tells the story of how a pepperoni pizza inspired Freddy's face. There's also a small tidbit relating to the fact that New Line almost sold the "Nightmare" rights to Paramount. "Welcome to Primetime" concludes with the first alternate ending of the original "Elm Street" film. The index of the disc is divided into separate sections by film. The "Nightmare on Elm Street" section is just a breakdown of the "Welcome to Primetime" documentary with the addition of the film's trailer. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (1:49), "It Really Happened" (3:03), "A Childhood Memory" (2:35), "Sometime in the Early 80's" (0:25), "So it Began" (4:47), "Beauty and the Beast" (8:42), "Making the Glove" (1:09), "Shapeshifter" (9:54), "The Shoot" (7:22), "The Revolving Room" (1:53), "All's Well That Ends Well" (4:04), "Talalay's Tally" (1:52), "It Couldn't Have Happened..." (1:51) and "Alternate Ending: Version 1" (2:00). The "Freddy's Revenge" section expresses Craven's concerns over the original screenplay for the sequel. We're also treated to horrendously bland interviews with director Jack Sholder who does nothing to bring perspective to his sequel, owing a lot of explanations and offering very few. He also sounds very indecisive of the choices he made now that he has the opportunity to look back on his film. Even production assistant Rachel Talalay admits the film's vast array of mistakes. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (1:28), "Heroes and Villains" (6:23), "Psycho Sexual Circus" (3:28), "The Male Witch" (2:48) and "Freddy on 8th Street" (5:29). The "Dream Warriors" section finds Wes explaining how he wanted to take the film series to the next psychological level. Director Chuck Russell and screenplay writer Frank Darabont share discussions about the controversies surrounding the Freddy snake and the Robert Englund-improvised "welcome to prime time, b*tch" line. Englund is also on hand to relate a tale of how he had breakfast with transvestites across from the L.A. county jail. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (1:37), "Fan Mail" (0:46), "Onward Christian Soldiers" (9:02), "Snakes and Ladders" (6:05), "Trading 8's" (4:10), "That's Show Biz" (2:01), "Burn Out" (3:39), "The House That Freddy Built" (0:39) and "Music Video: Dokken - Dream Warriors" (5:06). The "Dream Master" section finds Robert Shaye explaining how the 'stamina effect' helped director Renny Harlin get the job. Discussions are also held about how the writers' strike affected the outcome of the movie. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (1:31), "Krueger, Freddy Krueger" (8:17), "Hopeless Chest" (3:46), "Let's Make-Up" (2:21) and "The Finnish Line" (2:28). The "Dream Child" section finds Talalay mentioning why her husband Rupert Harvey produced the fifth film and not her. Surprisingly, the Fat Boys music video was misplaced on the disc. Instead of appearing in the section for the fourth film where it belongs, it wound up here. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (0:46), "Womb Raiders" (6:24), "The Sticky Floor" (5:46), "Take the Stairs" (0:57), "Hopkins Directs" (0:36), "A Slight Miscalculation" (1:27), "Music Video: Fat Boys - Are You Ready For Freddy?" (5:32) and "Music Video: Whodini - Anyway I Got to Swing it?" (3:26). The "Freddy's Dead" section is the lightest of all sections, though it does find Talalay talking about how the 3-D format of the finale limited her choice of special effects. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (2:14), "Rachel's Dream" (2:50), "3D Demise" (2:19), "86'd" (1:41) and "Hellraiser" (0:40). The "New Nightmare" section focuses entirely on Craven himself. He discusses how he originally thought he would become a novelist and touches briefly on the friendship he shares with "Friday the 13th" creator Sean Cunningham. Segments in this section include "Original Theatrical Trailer" (2:41), "Becoming a Filmmaker" (7:55), "An Insane Troupe" (0:52), "Two Worlds" (2:04), "The Problem With Sequels" (1:36) and "Filmmaker" (4:38). The final section is entitled "Conclusions" and features horror master Clive Barker comparing Freddy's characteristics with Pinhead's. We're also able to see small sections of a 1989 interview with Robert Englund as he discusses the witty and sexy traits Freddy possesses. Segments in this section include "Where Gothic Plots Come From" (2:04), "Why We Like Gothic" (1:34), "Sadomasochism" (0:54), "Freddy v. Pinhead" (2:46), "Freddy's Manic Energy" (1:40), "Creating Lasting Characters in Horror" (1:33), "No More Magic Tricks" (2:28), "Monster With Personality" (0:33), "Freddy as Sex Machine" (1:59) and "Campfire Stories" (1:43). Overall, this is an enjoyable and highly informative way of killing four hours.

    THEY SAY THEY'RE SPECIAL BUT...: The 1.33:1 full screen format is a solid presentation featuring even flesh tones, good coloring and stable black levels. The 5.1 surround sound is pointless during the documentary portions of the disc. The only time the surround sound really picks up is during the music videos and the theatrical trailers. Then the presence of the 5.1 is truly felt and truly appreciated. This bonus disc arrives packaged in one of New Line's atypical paper cases. The front cover features a fantastic "Hellywood" painting that fits the Freddy motif perfectly. The rest of the case is devoid of any artwork. The inside of the case spotlights the list of special features on this disc. The disc itself is painted with a montage of six different Freddy Krueger photographs. The entire disc is comprised of special features, however the ones not described above include the actual "Labyrinth" video game which is a wonderful way to experience the separate pieces of information for those who want to take the time. Graphics for this game are very entertaining and the sound quality is above par. DVD-ROM users are also treated to the final "Dream World" trivia game and an interactive Freddy that will "haunt" your computer.

    THE YOLK'S ON YOU: New Line Cinema has packed their boxed set so well that they don't need to place hidden easter eggs on the separate discs. Of course, on this bonus disc, there are a few useful pearls of wisdom for the wary viewer. For starters, if you stand in one spot for too long at the entrance of the "Labyrinth" (where the question mark appears), Freddy will pop out of one of the doors on the left side of the hallway and quickly dart into one of the doors on the right. Also, if you make it down into the boiler room, look into the ashes of the furnace for awhile. Pretty soon, you'll be able to see the burning image of Freddy himself. Finally, for those viewers searching for the mythical "second alternate ending" to the film (which is not included as part of the index section on this disc), there's a very simple solution. When you come to the locked fire door, step up to it until you can see the individual diamond panes of the glass. There are three horizontal rows of clickable diamonds. Each row has four diamonds you can try. The alternate ending is hidden beneath the fourth diamond (the one farthest to the right) on the middle row. However, be warned that the "second alternate ending" is not worth the time it takes to find. Frankly, it's an incredible let down, even to a hardcore Freddy fanatic like myself. Forget the second alternate ending and try to uncover all the Krueger cut-ups instead.

    THE LEWD AND NUDE ALERT: There is absolutely no stimulation on this bonus disc. However, since this is mostly a documentary forum, that's to be expected.

    THE GORE REPORT: The bonus disc actually shows a bit of gore in the original theatrical trailer during Tina Gray's (Amanda Wyss) death sequence.

    SAY AGAIN: "Sometimes a giant snake is just a giant snake. Yeah." - Frank Darabont. "Exactly." - Chuck Russell. "Which is why it wound up eating the little girl." - Frank Darabont (during a conversation about the phallic symbolism of the Freddy snake from "Nightmare 3").

    THE FINAL SAY: Yes, I recommend buying this disc. As part of the "Nightmare on Elm Street Collection" boxed set, it provides an invaluable source of behind the scenes discussions and revelations. One wishes they would have had more interviews with the actual cast members of the films, but the crew members and Robert Englund provide a wealth of details. It's just a shame that this disc is not available separately as it stands very well on its own. Yes, I also recommend buying the boxed set itself. This is an efficient way of acquiring all seven films and is the only way you can receive the bonus disc.

    PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM: "Freddy's Favorites: The Best of a Nightmare on Elm Street" Available on Varese Sarabande Compact Discs.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The best box set ever!!
    This box set is great , it has so many special features that i just haven't finished seeing them. I have a lot of box sets , and let me tell you that this one is the best of all, the movies are great , the encyclopedia disc is so good...this is a must have!! ... Read more

    Asin: 0780626966
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


    $79.98

    Freddy vs. Jason (New Line Platinum Series)
    by New Line Home Entertainment
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    DVD (14 September, 2004)
    list price: $19.96 -- our price: $15.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Editorial Review

    After 11 years in development hell and screenplay drafts by 13 different writers, the long-awaited smackdown of Freddy vs. Jason finally arrives. After making their respective debuts in Friday the 13th (1980) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984), the hockey-masked killer Jason Voorhees (Ken Kirzinger, replacing long-time Jason performer Kane Hodder) and razor-gloved Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) square off in a slasher-franchise combo-deal that only their most devoted fans will appreciate; turns out this is a lightweight match in which nobody wins. It's an average entry in the histories of these horror icons, comparable to half of their previous sequels, and Bride of Chucky director Ronny Yu satisfies purists with plenty of gushing blood and mayhem when Freddy recruits Jason to slice 'n' dice the ill-fated teens who've forgotten Freddy's once-formidable reign of terror. While it logically connects the gruesome legacies of Nightmare's Elm Street and Friday's Camp Crystal Lake, this horror hybrid is shockingly uninspired. It briefly peaks when Freddy gives the unconscious Jason a dream-world pummeling, but their ultimate showdown's a draw. In the immortal words of Peggy Lee, is that all there is? --Jeff Shannon ... Read more

    Features

    • Color
    • Widescreen
    Reviews (607)

    5-0 out of 5 stars JASON AND FREDDY TOGETHER AT LAST!!!!!
    Well its finally here Jason and Freddy what more can we ask for!!!! This movie is awesome and it has enough gore and it has two legendary boogeymen together for the first time!!! I like the cast and i love the story how they bring them together!!!! Of course it starts out at crystal lake and jason kills this girl which is freddy and tells jason to go to elm street and then he gets his killing game on then!!!! The dvd two set has a lot of cool extras and not only that,but you finally have jason and freddy together so go out and buy this movie like i said before what more can we ask for!!!!!

    4-0 out of 5 stars What more could you want?
    The fact that 'Freddy vs. Jason' is as good as it is is practically miraculous.Of all the outrageous, silly fanboy concepts that have been thrown around over the years, the Freddy-Jason crossover is one of the wackiest.Furthermore, even if it were to get made, odds are that the studios wouldn't put any effort or money into it, and just cheaply slap it together, knowing that people will see it anyway.Certainly, 'Freddy vs. Jason' is not a great piece of art, nor a great film, but it's a load of fun, and manages to find the right tone:It's got humor without being a smug campfest, and has a script that was written seriously enough that the whole film doesn't seem as ridiculous as it probably ought to.It's also got a sharp, surprisingly classy visual style, care of director Ronny Yu, and a lot a cool gore, at least by mainstream film standards.That's about all I'd want from this film.

    The basic premise is this: The adults of Springwood have thoroughly erased the memory of Freddy Krueger, which has made him lose his power, and his ability to kill.In order to get back, Freddy invades Jason's death-dreams, posing as his mother, saying 1- Stop being dead, stupid, you're immortal 2- Go to Springwood, start killing.Naturally, once Jason's rampage begins, the adults begin to suspect that it's Freddy's doing, and he starts to regain his power.Freddy soon returns to full power, but Jason won't stop killing, which naturally aggravates Freddy, so he decides to take care of Jason.Throughout all this, there are a number of teens who must find out what's going own, and fight for their lives etc. but the specifics regarding them don't really matter.

    Of course, the new world and mythology is not 100% consistent with what came before, but, it's pretty good, and it's not as if the original films were remotely consistent anyway, so this one couldn't possibly make it all add up.Certainly, the plot is nothing to write home about, but the film actually has one, and it is awhole lot less idiotic than I'd anticipated.The characterization doesn't fare as well, as they tend not to be particularly interesting, and are often cliched (the sassy black chick, the stoner, young cop who trusts the teens, Nerdlinger etc.) but, eh, who cares?The only characters who matter are Freddy and Jason, here played by Robert Englund and Ken Kirzinger.Englund does a good job with Freddy, naturally, making him a bit more menacing and less humorous than he tended to be in the latter films.I, like many others, was a bit upset when I heard that Hodder wouldn't be playing Jason, but Kirzinger does a great job. (not that there's all that much to the role)He plays it in about the same way that Hodder did in Jason X, as the huge, lumbering yet somewhat contemplative killing machine, but w/o much of the sardonic detachment that Hodder through into the role in X.(Which is appropriate, as although 'Freddy vs. Jason' is hardly completely serious, it isn't as jokey and campy as that film)Although I still think it's pretty damn lame that Hodder got booted from the job, I think the practical effect on the film is pretty much nil.

    Though the film certainly isn't scary, it's occasionally a bit eerie, and the dream sequences are generally very nicely done.(The first dream the Monica Keena character has is particularly good)Of course, I've always been a Jason man, and the scenes of him hacking up innumerable teens are always a delight.Notions of suspense are almost completely lacking, but it's got a high body count and plenty of great kills.(Jason's first real kill is one of the most brutal, yet funny he's ever had, and there's an excellent, uhh, cut-in-half, death, too)Also, there's an utterly priceless scene where he storms a rave, after being dosed in everclear and lit aflame, cutting swath throught the teens like a flaming angel of death.

    The funny thing is, although the notion of Freddy and Jason being in a film together is pretty amusing, the idea of them fighting isn't all that exciting to me.These scenes actually turned out very well, though I think the scenes of them dealing with the kids are generally better.Freddy uses lots of Freddy-fu on Jason, which is pretty damn funny, and their final confrontation earns lots of points for sheer gruesomeness. (I seriously doubt the MPAA would allow this level of violence to be wrought on truly human characters w/o earning the film an NC-17 rating)

    Yeah, I guess I'm done.Reviews are pointless, as anyone interested in this film already saw it, but, whatever.Also, the DVD looks very, very nice.

    5-0 out of 5 stars It's Friday the 13th on Elm Street...where are your kids?
    Was never a huge fan of either series, but man this movie is the bomb, tons of action and fighting, a great guy flick...would not recommend you loaning it to your mom!

    Rumored and anticipated for years, the two biggest icons of the slasher genre finally meet in Freddy Vs. Jason, the eighth entry in the Nightmare on Elm Street saga and the 11th film in the Friday the 13th series, though with Jason X taking place in the future, it should be noted that the events of this film take place after the ninth film Jason Goes to Hell.

    And it is hell where Freddy Kreuger (Robert Englund) and Jason Voorhees (Ken Kirzinger, donning the hockey mask for the first time in a controversial snub against series veteran Kane Hodder) finally become acquainted. Banished there for eternity, Freddy devises a plan to manipulate Jason into continuing his work, hacking up the teenagers of Elm Street.

    All goes well at first until Jason realizes he's been duped by "the dream master" and is none too pleased. Coaxed by surviving teenagers Will (Jason Ritter), Lori (Monica Keena), and Kia (Destiny's Child's Kelly Rowland), Jason and Freddy descend upon Crystal Lake for a mano a mano battle royal. ... Read more

    Asin: B0000VCZMK
    Subjects:  1. Horror   


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